Best SDS Drill in 2020 [Our Reviews and Comparison]

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Best SDS Drill

Power drills are a basic need on any job site, from a few minor house repairs to heavy construction. There are any number of reasons to need a power drill at hand, and every one of them is also a reason you want to make sure it’s a good drill.

Of course, ‘power drill’ does not mean that it will cut through anything. Your average handyman or homeowner’s drill will struggle to go through masonry, concrete, or stones, and will likely be unable to support the long bits needed for sinking deep support screws. Even if it can manage to hold them – and some smaller drills will not have a wide enough chuck – the added mass of the drill bit will weigh down on the chuck and slow the whole machine down, cutting your speed and efficiency and possibly even stopping the drill from getting through at all.

A preliminary solution to this was created with the invention of the hammer drill, which achieves superior results over an ordinary drill by moving the chuck back and forth as it spins. This creates a degree of impact as well as the rotary scraping of the bit, forcing the cutting edge farther into the material being drilled with less pressure from the operator.

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This new mechanism only goes so far, though, and faced a serious issue of decreased efficiency and increased demands on drill batteries. The action to move the chuck was different from that required to simply spin the bit, and took more energy. Additionally, the larger the drill orbit, the less practical this became. At larger sizes, the movement of the drill bit along with the chuck becomes more erratic, resulting in a wider hole than desired and decidedly reduced efficiency.

These problems changed for good in 1975, when the Bosch and Hilti corporations premiered the Slotted Drive System (SDS) drill bit. This bit is only marginally different in appearance from other bits, with a small groove at the end as the only visible change, but has a significant advantage over ordinary drills.

In an ordinary drill, both the chuck mouth and the drill bit are shaped like a triangle, and the Y-jaw of the chuck is closed and tightened to effectively make the bit a part of the chuck. A hammer drill moves the chuck as a whole, including the bit, to make a whole.

In an SDS drill, although the jaws still lock on to impart the spinning motion, a ball bearing in each jaw of the chuck slots into the groove in the drill bit and rolls freely along the groove as the drill is in motion, stopped only by the end of the groove. This allows the bit to move back and forth independent of the chuck, requiring less effort and moving faster and more precisely than the whole chuck would.

Although this may seem like a small advantage to have, power tools are capable of repeating the motion thousands of times a minute, adding up into a visible and indispensable advantage to having an SDS drill. Any experienced builder knows not to accept a substitute, especially for larger and harder pieces of material.

Considering the heavy work you’ll be relying on your SDS to handle, you’ll want a good one when you next head for the job site. The market for power tools is overwhelming as always, but we’ve narrowed it down to the top 10 options to get your building project moving in earnest.

Comparison Table

PRODUCT FEATURES LATEST PRICE
1. Bosch Professional GBH 3-28 DFR
  • Trusted manufacturer
  • Endless running time
  • Easy-change chuck
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2. Makita HR2630
  • Variable speed knob
  • One-push chuck
  • Torque limiter
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3. DeWalt D25133K-GB
  • No heat problems
  • Minimal vibration
  • Mechanical clutch
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4. Duratool D03225
  • Cheaper than other hammer drills
  • Chuck is 10mm larger
  • Carrying case included
  • Comes with three of the most commonly needed drill bits
  • Specialized chiseling function as well as ordinary hammer and drill functions
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5. Hitachi DH28PCY2WSZ
  • Trusted manufacturer
  • Reversible function
  • Safety clutch handle
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6. Vonhaus
  • Battery-powered mobility
  • Easy to grip
  • Customable handle angle
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7. Silverline 633821
  • Compact build
  • Low vibrations and noise
  • Large grip flanges
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8. Evolution Power Tools SDS4-800
  • High-energy impact
  • High-torque motor
  • Ergonomic rear grip
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9. Einhell RT- RH 32
  • Dual shock absorbers
  • Safety clutch
  • Powerful motor
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10. TITAN TTB653SDS
  • Magnesium gearbox
  • Replaceable brushes
  • Vibration dampening grip
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Our Best SDS Drill Reviews and Comparisons

1. Bosch Professional GBH 3-28 DFR

Product Highlights

This company was the actual inventor of SDS drills and has kept on supplying great hardware ever since.

Features

  • Corded electric at 240 V
  • 6.5 kilograms
  • 900rpm top speed
  • 44 centimeters long

What We Like About Bosch Professional GBH 3-28 DFR

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What We Don’t Like About Bosch Professional GBH 3-28 DFR

Where drill or hammering power abounds, so too do noise and vibration. This tool has plenty of both, making it less pleasant to use than similar models.

PROS

  • Trusted manufacturer
  • Endless running time with corded power
  • Easy-change chuck
  • Balanced weight makes it easy to hold and maneuver
  • Ball grommet prevents the cable breaking

CONS

  • Noisier than other models
  • Bits not included

2. Makita HR2630

Product Highlights

Makita’s drills feature easy controls that allow minute alterations of each aspect of the drilling or hammering process.

Features

  • Corded electric at 240V
  • 2.8 kilograms
  • 1200 rpm maximum speed
  • 42 centimeters long

What We Like About Makita HR2630

Makita features one-touch controls that let you select hammer or drill, control depth, and switch speeds so quickly you won’t even need to stop drilling.

What We Don’t Like About Makita HR2630

The minute controls allow for sudden changes that can cause unwanted damage and even be dangerous, requiring extra caution when using this drill.

PROS

  • Variable speed knob
  • One-push chuck
  • Three operating modes with easy selector switch
  • Torque limiter stops the drill in case of jams

CONS

  • Controls can be bumped accidentally
  • Relatively high vibration

3. DeWalt D25133K-GB

Product Highlights

You haven’t really started talking about power tools unless you’ve mentioned DeWalt, purveyor of leading power tools in every field, and noted for excellent performance and robust construction.

Features

  • Corded electric at 240V
  • 26mm chuck
  • Weighs 3.9 kilograms
  • 33.5 centimeters long

What We Like About DeWalt D25133K-GB

DeWalt’s hammer drill, like many of their products, is noted by the professional community for its speed of operation and considerable durability even under regular worksite conditions.

What We Don’t Like About DeWalt D25133K-GB

This drill is sold with fairly minimal accessories, requiring the buyer to mix and match instead of simply grabbing and getting to work.

PROS

  • Professionally trusted brand
  • Cuts through steel or masonry in a hurry
  • Works for longer without heat problems
  • Minimal vibration or noise issues
  • Mechanical clutch, impact and rotation stops

CONS

  • No bits or maintenance supplies included
  • Will need to be near an outlet to work

4. Duratool D03225

Product Highlights

Those shopping on a budget will welcome this drill, costing significantly less than similar tools while delivering comparable performance.

Features

  • Corded electric power supply
  • 32mm chuck
  • 4300rpm maximum speed
  • 2 meter electrical cable

What We Like About Duratool D03225

This drill has a larger chuck and smaller price tag than many similar models, making it the default choice for anyone looking to save on their job without cutting corners on quality.

What We Don’t Like About Duratool D03225

The power cable on this drill is noticeably shorter than other corded hammer drills, limiting the user’s movement to within two meters of an outlet.

PROS

  • Noticeably cheaper than other hammer drills
  • Chuck is as much as 10mm larger than other drills
  • Carrying case included
  • Comes with three of the most commonly needed drill bits
  • Specialized chiseling function as well as ordinary hammer and drill functions

CONS

  • Short power cord
  • Not as durable as similar drills

5. Hitachi DH28PCY2WSZ

Product Highlights

This drill features a dedicated system to reduce vibration and minimize wasted drill movement as you work.

Features

What We Like About Hitachi DH28PCY2WSZ

This drill has a dedicated anti-vibration bumper included that cushions the shocks of hammering against a softer rubber material, letting you drill more comfortably and accurately.

What We Don’t Like About Hitachi DH28PCY2WSZ

This drill is noticeably heavier than others, and the chuck requires more effort to loosen and secure.

PROS

  • Trusted manufacturer
  • Reversible function clears jams automatically
  • Striking and rotary force control knobs
  • Mode selector is easy to reach
  • Safety clutch handle

CONS

  • Hard to change drill bits quickly
  • Heavier than many other drills

6. Vonhaus

Product Highlights

Take this drill to any work site. Vonhaus provides everything you need for grab-and-go functionality, including a lithium-ion battery pack and charger.

Features

  • Battery powered at 20V for 4Ah
  • 31 centimeters long
  • 2.1 kilograms
  • SDS+ compatible

What We Like About Vonhaus

This drill is built with two rubberized grips and 360-degree foregrip rotation to give you a comfortable and secure hold on your tool, no matter what position you’re working in.

What We Don’t Like About Vonhaus

Because this drill is battery-powered, users will need to keep an eye on power levels and either pack more batteries or stop to recharge.

PROS

  • Battery-powered mobility
  • Easy to grip
  • Customable handle angle
  • Accessories included
  • Two year manufacturer warranty

CONS

  • Limited running time
  • Not recommended for chiseling work

7. Silverline 633821

Product Highlights

This is a great entry-level tool for people who are just now starting to expand their interests into projects requiring a hammer drill.

Features

  • Corded electric at 850w
  • 800 rpm maximum speed
  • Weighs 4.58 kilograms
  • 46.4 centimeters long

What We Like About Silverline 633821

This tool is easy to operate and control, an ideal and inexpensive choice for inexperienced or infrequent workers facing only basic tasks.

What We Don’t Like About Silverline 633821

Although it is a fine basic model, this tool is not up to the rigors of continual worksite use and may prove unreliable under prolonged workloads.

PROS

  • Compact build is easy to grip
  • Low vibrations and noise
  • Inexpensive model
  • Carrying case and accessories included
  • Large grip flanges for slip protection

CONS

  • Not suitable for heavy tasks or regular usage
  • Heavier than some more durable drills

8. Evolution Power Tools SDS4-800

Product Highlights

This tool packs a number of added functions besides the usual drill and hammer options, letting you get more done without switching tools between tasks.

Features

  • Corded electric at 230V
  • 1100rpm maximum speed
  • Weighs 3.5 kilograms
  • 32 centimeters long

What We Like About Evolution Power Tools SDS4-800

By adding a chisel and rotator function to this drill, the manufacturers allow a worker to tackle a much broader range of tasks without needing to stitch tools or even bits sometimes.

What We Don’t Like About Evolution Power Tools SDS4-800

The fittings work loose quickly when used in hammer or chisel mode, including the chuck jaws, making it unsuitable for any precision tasks.

PROS

  • Two additional operating modes beyond the normal ones
  • High-energy impact
  • Foregrip connection locks in tight enough to prevent unwanted slippage
  • High-torque motor
  • Ergonomic rear grip with comfort molding

CONS

  • Fittings come loose during prolonged usage
  • Not suitable where exact drilling is required

9. Einhell RT- RH 32

Product Highlights

This drill uses an all-metal chassis and shock dampening system to minimize workplace damage, making sure that your tools will last well into the future.

Features

  • Corded electric at 230v
  • Weighs 9.25 kilograms
  • 44.5 centimeters long
  • 1250w motor

What We Like About Einhell RT- RH 32

The thick metal chassis on this drill, combined with a shock absorber built into the handle, making this a smooth and steady tool with a number of fail-safes that protect the operator in case something goes wrong.

What We Don’t Like About Einhell RT- RH 32

Using metal for the tool housing instead of plastic and rubber-like other manufacturers makes this drill cumbersomely heavy, weighing more than four kilos beyond other models.

PROS

  • Dual shock absorbers in the handle
  • Thick metal housing is highly resilient to workplace damage
  • Deadman switch stops the dril immediately if the grip is released
  • Safety clutch brakes the drill in case of a jam
  • Exceptionally powerful motor

CONS

  • Nearly twice the weight of comparable drills
  • Warranty only covers buyers in the United Kingdom

10. TITAN TTB653SDS

Product Highlights

This drill uses advanced materials for a lighter and more durable drill without sacrificing precision or drilling power.

Features

  • Corded electric at 240v
  • 750rpm maximum speed
  • 8J impact energy
  • 1500w motor

What We Like About TITAN TTB653SDS

Using a magnesium gearbox and industrial plastic housing, this drill is able to pack outstanding power into a lighter package, nearly doubling the output of competing models.

What We Don’t Like About TITAN TTB653SDS

Using so much energy all at once makes this drill highly inefficient and liable to burn out quicker than similarly sized and priced drills.

PROS

  • Magnesium gearbox extruder heat quickly
  • Industrial plastic gives a firm grip
  • Replaceable brushes for easy maintenance
  • Vibration dampening grip
  • High impact energy gets the job done faster

CONS

  • Burns out relatively quickly
  • Limited warranty coverage

Final Verdict

Hammerdrills enjoy a well-deserved spot on any construction site, enabling their users to cut through thick masonry and stonework in short order and with little added effort. Getting yourself a good one is a key to making your projects quick, easy, and above all done right.

Any piece of construction equipment needs to be treated with respect when it can break through solid concrete walls, and the SDS hammer drill is no exception. Operators should always give their drill a solid purchase and their full and undivided attention from the moment it is turned on until it is safely stored away.

Work gloves with a high-friction surface are a must, as is proper ear and eye protection. The hammer drill’s striking action creates significantly more noise, vibration, and splinters than a standard drill, so proper attire is crucial when handling one.

Before using your SDS drill, take a moment to make sure your drill bit is the right kind of SDS. Three distinct varieties exist – SDS, SDS+, and SDS Max – and not all drills are compatible with each one.

Storing and maintaining your drill is particularly important with SDS drills, as they pose a high-wear component that an ordinary drill does not. The ball bearings that are at the center of any SDS drill system must be carefully and regularly inspected to make sure that they are still rotating properly and fit smoothly into the bits as they are inserted.

If you notice your drill wearing out in some parts, don’t try to repair it yourself unless the part is specified as user-serviceable. Take the tool to a licensed dealer for that brand to be certain of proper repair work, brand-name parts, and to keep the warranty valid.

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